Four new, inspiring ways to keep fit in 2018

Innovative ways to keep to your new year’s resolutions while still having fun!

By on 8 January, 2018 Filed in Health, Lifestyle, Sport

You’ve probably already broken four out of the six new year’s resolutions that you made on New Year’s Eve. It’s also likely that at least one of them was about fitness or getting more active, and that you’re probably sick of hearing about the upcoming trends for the year ahead.

However, an increasing awareness of fitness and wellbeing has led to an array of unique ways to get moving. From dance to swimming there is something for everyone, and it might be that an alternative way to get fit might be the thing you were always looking for.

Mermaid Fit

Mermaid swimming has been on the periphery of sport for a while, having been dubbed an extreme sport until it started to go mainstream in late 2017. Popping up at swimming pools all around the world is the new “Mermaid Fit” class. Inspired by the fins of free divers, the mono-fin fitness class encourages movement akin to that of a dolphin, and is a great way to keep fit and have fun.

A mermaid course starts with the basics of learning how to make your body move like a mermaid, and by the end you’ll be gliding through the water. Mermaid Fit works your whole body, as you readjust to the way of movement, and engage your core and shoulders to deliver strength to your glutes. The tail can weigh as much as two stone, and is often made of neoprene and silicone, so you won’t be wearing a full tail from your first lesson, but the workout is worth the weight.

Aerial Silks

Some trends can have a brutally quick turnaround, but others stick around for a while. You’re probably sick of hearing about Bitcoin and the blockchain, but the currency is set for a major upward trend throughout 2018, and there are even Bitcoin casinos to check out.

Similarly, fitness trends which might have seemed kooky a year or so ago are now hot property. When you fancy getting active, and heading for the sky, then you might want to try and aerial silk class. Aerial silks are usually the preserve of graceful performers at the Cirque du Soleil, however, an aerial silks class will have you feeling weightless whilst learning to counterbalance and lift your own body weight.

The performers that you see don’t just do silks, Cirque du Soleil demands rigorous training, so you might want to combine it with a cardio class or conditioning. If you feel as though you aren’t seeing results from your gym routine, this is the perfect way to combat that.

Virtual Reality Fitness


Whilst wearable tech might not be number one for fitness trends in 2018, technology and fitness still make great bedfellows. Virtual reality is taking off in so many sectors and fitness is no exception. If you want to disrupt your morning spinning class, why not put on a pair of VR goggles and cycle through the solar system. Different gyms will have a range of VR experiences. No more can anyone tell you that you’re lazy for playing a video game, because you’re doing it at 6am… on a bike!


The wellness brigade have even taken over sacred club ground, but fear not, you can still get your martinis on the dancefloor. This is an entirely new club. The Morning Gloryville crew in Shoreditch found a space for a pre-work rave which was about getting the endorphins flowing. Morning clubbing is now taking off around the country as a way to get fit to great music and meet new people. Attendance isn’t mandatory, but if you do show up, make sure you have your neon sweat band!

Whether you’re a fitness phobic or a seasoned gym goer, one thing is for sure, exercise is getting more exciting for 2018, and the wacky trends aren’t going anywhere. It might be time to ditch the running shoes and take to the skies in some silks, or perhaps a morning rave is more your thing?

Adam Lowe

Adam Lowe

Adam Lowe is an award-winning author, editor and publisher from Leeds, now based in Manchester. He runs Dog Horn Publishing and is Director and Writing Coordinator for Young Enigma, a writer development programme for LGBT young people.
Adam Lowe